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remote jobs for introverts

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text on image: remote jobs for introverts

Introverts aren’t “shy,” which is a common misperception. It also doesn’t necessarily mean that someone doesn’t like to be around people, or that we’re antisocial. But that image has been so ingrained and associated with the introvert personality that it’s hard to overcome now, and trying to find jobs or work environments or jobs that will suit your work personality – but also leave you with some energy at the end of the day for your own projects or activities.

Working remotely has been a game changer for me, and for many others in the I-personality types, HSPs, or other general introverted personalities.

I’m not going to pretend that “become a blogger!” or “just become a writer” are viable money-making options for most workers. You have to be amazingly lucky to become a millionaire blogger, and a lot of things have to go right (and a lot of time needs to be spent) to refine writing skills.

Freelancing isn’t a great option either – many introverts can be risk-averse and the idea of constantly pitching, looking for the next job, and long wait times to get payment (plus the labor of chasing down the check) make it less than desirable way to make a living.

Working remotely isn’t for everyone, though – you have to have high standards for yourself, create your own office setting, and keep yourself accountable. But it also means there can be fewer interpersonal distractions, which makes it really desirable for introverts. If you’re stuck feeling like you’ll never be as successful at work as you want to be because your environment isn’t conducive to producing your best work, consider looking to transition into roles like these – many of which don’t require a special certification, or can be self-taught with online resources. Here are a few titles to look for, and some companies that are hiring now!

UX Designer: One of the best industries for empaths and introverts is UI/UX design. We can often put ourselves in the shoes of other people easily, often to our own detriment, but it can pay off when sketching out user stories or customer personas. These positions blend technical concepts with layouts and human behavior, which often pay off when combined with introvert tendencies.
Currently hiring: UI/UX Designer at TwentyOverTen.

Customer Support: It might sound counterintuitive that customer service is good for introverts, but when support is offered through email and live chat portals rather than phones or in-person interaction, much of the pressure is removed. The way many introverts can easily establish a repoire with customers through these outlets makes them great candidates for these positions – and can help with some of the emotional energy zaps that hands-on service can excise.
Currently hiring: Customer Experience Agent at Rhone, Customer Support Advocate at Airtable

Accounting: Accounting is a pretty largely autonomous position in most companies, which makes it ideal for people who prefer to work on their own. In small-to-mid-size companies, you might even be the only person in the department, which means you can even structure your day and interactions around what works best for you. (It’s also a position that could eventually lead you to owning your own business, if that’s something you wanted!)
Currently hiring: Finance Operations Manager at ConvertKit.

Looking for an empowering community of women in technology? Check out Tech Ladies for networking opportunities, exclusive job openings, and fun local events!

User Research: Similar to UX Design, this field involves testing concepts, running user tests, and writing scripts to run through product changes. Working from a script, these employees might interview focus groups, opt for one-on-one testing (which can also be done remotely with tools like UserTesting.com), research similar product and their target audiences, and create personas for existing and potential user bases.
Currently hiring: Sr. User Researcher at Crowdstrike.

Test Scorer: Companies like Pearson hire distributed employees, both full-time and seasonally, to score things like practice tests, ACTs, or other essay responses. Cozy up at your dining room table with a coffee and some focus music, and break out the red pen. Since there are no cubicle-mates and the scoring guidelines means it’s a relatively low-pressure job for someone who prefers to work more independently.
Currently hiring: Professional Scorer at Pearson.

January 8, 2020
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7 companies hiring work from home employees this month: april 2018

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We’ve finally strung together multiple sunny days here in Chicago, so I’m still pretty cautious, but I think I feel safe enough to say that spring is here. Something about the summer has always made it seem like it’s time for new beginnings – and maybe for you, that means a new job. Here are seven current opportunities – many of them don’t even require prior remote experience!

Fan Happiness Associate at Gametime: Gametime is a mobile ticketing platform, and they’re currently hiring in certain states. Preference is given to those with previous remote experience, or in a tech or live entertainment setting, but don’t let that stop you from applying! If you enjoy providing excellent quality customer service and solving problems (often time-sensitive), this could be the gig for you.

Customer Support Associate at CareMessage: This company is a nonprofit that helps make healthcare more accessible to underserved or rural communities. As a CSA, you’ll help customers find answers, troubleshoot issues in the software, and work with the engineering team to implement user requests. They also have a clear 1/3/6 month plan for new employees, which helps to eliminate some of the stress and imposter syndrome associated with starting a new position. Knowing what the company expects from you helps a lot!

Beauty Writer at Elite Daily/Bustle: This one screams for beauty bloggers or Sephora VIBs to apply. I love mindlessly browsing Bustle, and I’ve found some great beauty suggestions here – if you’re always getting your friends hooked on new beauty items, this is the writing job for you. Bonus if you have a background in commerce writing (if you’re a blogger who uses affiliate links, that’s probably you!)

Support Team Manager at Trello: I’ve long loved Trello, and their company culture sounds just as great as the product. Apply for this position to manage the support team, develop strategies to improve customer retention and acquisition, and manage daily operations, among other tasks.

Customer Success Manager at monday.com: If you’re in the PST/MST time zone and have excellent self-management skills, this customer-facing role with Saturday hours could be a great way to launch a remote career.

Lead Editor, Home Office at The Wirecutter: If you love home office tech gear and writing about it, this could be your “in” to work with the New York Times. They’re looking for an editor to manage and assign projects freelance staff, project manage content, and interact with the community. Sounds pretty cool for my gear-loving nerd head!

Customer Success Specialist at TaxJar: I’ve been learning a lot lately about taxes, and that’s all due to TaxJar. If you have a retail background, some remote work experience, and very patient, this could be a great option for you to build your support resume!

One of my favorite resources for freelance gigs is AND CO’s The Gig List. Every week they send an email with ten freelance opportunities – while they aren’t all remote options, many of them are (and they always find really cool options and companies!)

If you’re looking for freelance writing jobs, check out this post with tons of websites that pay for your submissions – or check out Contena, where you can search hundreds of new, legitimate writing and editing jobs every day.

April 27, 2018
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non-traditional jobs that let you travel

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This post contains affiliate links.

“Digital nomad” is more than a buzzword – it’s a way of life for a lot of travel lovers. Not all of these workers are self-employed, either! There are many careers based around travel, or ways you can work while traveling the country or the world. If you’re looking for a more creative job that puts you on the road more often (or even a side hustle that helps pad your travel account), I have a few ideas for you!

Flight attendant: Full disclosure: I’ve secretly always dreamed of being a flight attendant. One of my favorite blogs, The Flight Attendant Life, does nothing to dissuade this desire. It’s definitely hard work, though. Not only do you get to travel as part of your job, you’ll also have the perk of layovers, flight benefits on your days off, and a lot of flight attendants are based out of crash pads in tropical locations. (Kara from The Flight Attendant Life was even based in Hawaii.) The major airlines aren’t the only ones hiring: smaller airlines like Allegiant and Frontier also have lucrative options, and smaller, boutique airliners are catering to travelers who prefer a bit more comfort. It’s not a pretty website, but Flight Attendant Careers gets updated regularly by tons of airlines adding to their workforce.

Amazon: The online retailer hires hundreds of seasonal “pickers” every year, and they often provide camping facilities for their employees as well so you’re never too far from home. Here’s one review of their work camping experience, and they also offer work from home positions in their customer service department.

Yachting: It turns out that yachting is a dream job I didn’t even know I had until I happened to see Below Deck on Bravo one day (the source of all dream jobs, right?) These positions can be super lucrative, but they are hard work. You’re stuck on a small boat for weeks or months with the same few people, serving to assist the owners or charter guests, and depending on your position, doing laundry all day and night. (Which, honestly, doesn’t seem like the worst job on a yacht.) Read Lucky Charming by Kate Chastain (yachtie on Below Deck,) check out jobs on CrewfindersYacrew, and Bluewater Yachting – or just move down to one of the yacht capitals to get head hunted. (Another tip courtesy of Amy on Below Deckchecking out Craigslist in Fort Lauderdale! is )

VA: Being a virtual assistant is one of the most popular careers for digital nomads, and with good reason. Because there are so many tools out there that let you automate things like social posting, easily edit photos, and communicate with clients no matter what time zone you’re in (not to mention hotspots that allow you to hop on the internet from anywhere,) it’s one of the most flexible jobs available. Like I mentioned in my post on jobs you can do from home, larger VAs or agencies hire subcontractors if you don’t want to start your own business.

Music tour jobs: Growing up, my dream was to be a tour manager. I would still love to go on the road someday, but I’m at an age where it doesn’t really seem like it’s going to happen for me anymore. The music industry does tend to be all about who you know, with jobs often coming through by word of mouth. Bobnet was started at as listserv a few years ago, and it has an online board and Facebook group now where jobs are shared. roadiejobs.com is a resource that does post some tour jobs, and it’s worth checking out (but don’t expect to see a lot of every city as you tour – drives are long, days are longer, and sleep usually takes priority over sightseeing.) Another option to get on the road is to work with a sponsor for a big tour, like Warped Tour. Anti-smoking organization The Truth hires “riders” to travel to schools, concerts, and other events for promotions and marketing. If you’re vegan, PETA also hires touring interns and employees, as do other non-profits on the tour. A lot of them are internships or volunteer positions, but if this is a career you’re interested in and you’re in college, it’s an invaluable experience to have under your belt.

(Or think really outside the box – NASCAR races and teams also travel every weekend, and they have sponsors and merch trucks that need sellers too!)

Dance companies: I love Dance Moms, what can I say. The idea of spending weekends working at dance competitions actually just seems humorous to me! Aside from the parental drama, I do love dance and some of them are really beautiful and moving. Groove, Starquest, and NextLevelDance are just a few of the companies that produce these events.

Bus driving: If you like responsibility and prefer to travel with your wheels on the ground, bus driving is something to explore. Whether working for a travel company like Greyhound or as a private charter, you’ll have the option for long haul tours or jaunts that keep you closer to home.

For a similar side hustle on a smaller scale, look into limousine services or car rental businesses. Even a few hours of driving a week can result in lots of extra tips!

Cruise ships: “But you already talked about boats,” you might be saying. Cruise ships are an entirely different animal than the luxury world of yachting. They seem to have lower pay as there aren’t large tips (traditionally) on cruises, but they do offer many different niches like live entertainment or food service. Apply directly to a cruise line, check the job board at All Cruise Jobs, or hit indeed.com – some cruise lines even hire reservation agents and customer service staff to work remotely.

Event companies: Like the music tour sponsor and marketing companies, there are businesses that are dedicated to setting up large-scale events. These jobs have always seemed super fun, and I have quite a few friends that have worked for companies like Red Frog Events and Compass Rose. Traveling to different cities every week to set up conferences or fitness events, there is often some downtime to head out and check out the locale.

Tour guide: If you’re comfortable leading groups, this could be the best job for you. There are lots of organized travel agencies out there looking for trip leaders! G Adventures has a long history, as does Contiki, who hires local drivers as well as guides. Newer organizations like Remote Year are also looking for operations and experience managers in the cities they visit. If you have a lot of travel experience in a particular region, you can even make more!

Theater crew: If you’re artistically inclined but haven’t ever wanted to chase the rock ‘n roll lifestyle, a touring theater group could be your ticket to fame. (See what I did there?) Since plays and musicals tend to have longer stays in specific towns than music tours, they might be more desirable for someone not interested in the rushed pace of a different city every day. Even if you’re not a performer, there’s a place for you. Check out opportunities with specific troupes (like Cirque du Soleil or Blue Man Group!) or check out job boards at Playbill. brokeGIRLrich also has a super comprehensive resource of theatre job boards as well!

Housesitting: Yes, there are some people who make a career of housesitting! Many wealthy people who have multiple residences hire house sitters to stay at their different homes while they’re away. These positions usually involve a small bit of housekeeping or maintenance, but who cares? For free board in a lot of beautiful locations, I would probably have the tile floors scrubbed cleaned. Most of the job search sites for these positions are paid, and there’s a lot of background checks that can go into the application (with good reason.) Depending on what you’re looking for, House Sitters America, Luxury House Sitters and The Caretaker Gazette are good places to start. Even care.com has opportunities for house sitters!

National Parks: Any tourism industry will have boom and bust times where they need to hire more employees. National Parks are no different, and they’re a popular job option for many retirees who still want to work, but want to travel. It’s not just for retirees, though – many younger people are choosing this option to head out and explore. Check out this post on finding a job in a National Park!

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May 19, 2017
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