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digital nomad

remote jobs for introverts

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text on image: remote jobs for introverts

Introverts aren’t “shy,” which is a common misperception. It also doesn’t necessarily mean that someone doesn’t like to be around people, or that we’re antisocial. But that image has been so ingrained and associated with the introvert personality that it’s hard to overcome now, and trying to find jobs or work environments or jobs that will suit your work personality – but also leave you with some energy at the end of the day for your own projects or activities.

Working remotely has been a game changer for me, and for many others in the I-personality types, HSPs, or other general introverted personalities.

I’m not going to pretend that “become a blogger!” or “just become a writer” are viable money-making options for most workers. You have to be amazingly lucky to become a millionaire blogger, and a lot of things have to go right (and a lot of time needs to be spent) to refine writing skills.

Freelancing isn’t a great option either – many introverts can be risk-averse and the idea of constantly pitching, looking for the next job, and long wait times to get payment (plus the labor of chasing down the check) make it less than desirable way to make a living.

Working remotely isn’t for everyone, though – you have to have high standards for yourself, create your own office setting, and keep yourself accountable. But it also means there can be fewer interpersonal distractions, which makes it really desirable for introverts. If you’re stuck feeling like you’ll never be as successful at work as you want to be because your environment isn’t conducive to producing your best work, consider looking to transition into roles like these – many of which don’t require a special certification, or can be self-taught with online resources. Here are a few titles to look for, and some companies that are hiring now!

UX Designer: One of the best industries for empaths and introverts is UI/UX design. We can often put ourselves in the shoes of other people easily, often to our own detriment, but it can pay off when sketching out user stories or customer personas. These positions blend technical concepts with layouts and human behavior, which often pay off when combined with introvert tendencies.
Currently hiring: UI/UX Designer at TwentyOverTen.

Customer Support: It might sound counterintuitive that customer service is good for introverts, but when support is offered through email and live chat portals rather than phones or in-person interaction, much of the pressure is removed. The way many introverts can easily establish a repoire with customers through these outlets makes them great candidates for these positions – and can help with some of the emotional energy zaps that hands-on service can excise.
Currently hiring: Customer Experience Agent at Rhone, Customer Support Advocate at Airtable

Accounting: Accounting is a pretty largely autonomous position in most companies, which makes it ideal for people who prefer to work on their own. In small-to-mid-size companies, you might even be the only person in the department, which means you can even structure your day and interactions around what works best for you. (It’s also a position that could eventually lead you to owning your own business, if that’s something you wanted!)
Currently hiring: Finance Operations Manager at ConvertKit.

Looking for an empowering community of women in technology? Check out Tech Ladies for networking opportunities, exclusive job openings, and fun local events!

User Research: Similar to UX Design, this field involves testing concepts, running user tests, and writing scripts to run through product changes. Working from a script, these employees might interview focus groups, opt for one-on-one testing (which can also be done remotely with tools like UserTesting.com), research similar product and their target audiences, and create personas for existing and potential user bases.
Currently hiring: Sr. User Researcher at Crowdstrike.

Test Scorer: Companies like Pearson hire distributed employees, both full-time and seasonally, to score things like practice tests, ACTs, or other essay responses. Cozy up at your dining room table with a coffee and some focus music, and break out the red pen. Since there are no cubicle-mates and the scoring guidelines means it’s a relatively low-pressure job for someone who prefers to work more independently.
Currently hiring: Professional Scorer at Pearson.

January 8, 2020
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7 companies hiring work from home employees this month: august 2017

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This month’s remote job roundup is support and content heavy, as normal – with a few big name companies included. You might not even realize that places like Snapchat or TED hire remote workers, but they do – and they’re hiring now! Update that resume and dedicate some time this weekend working on your job search!

Operations Manager at The Engine Room: Here’s a secret: I’ve always wanted to work in operations. In high school, I would think and think: “what kind of job organizes things? How can I spend my life getting people where they need to go?”Tour managers, for sure. Event planners? When I moved to Virginia and worked at the arena, I learned about the operations department. Their entire jobs are dedicated to strategizing and planning. If this is something you enjoy, this job with The Engine Room might be for you!

Customer Support & Happiness at Later: I just read a book about women in technology that talked a lot about working at a startup. I’ve never had the interest, but this customer support opening at Later isn’t strictly service. You’ll be doing technical writing, triaging bugs, and working with the engineering team to work on a new product.

Operations Support Specialist at Karat: Karat is a company working to ease the hiring process in engineering. They’re looking for some evening and weekend support on their operations team – you’ll be developing communication protocols, assisting on interviews, and working to ensure quality. Operations Support Specialists also provide customer support, addressing any questions applicants have. This is a great opportunity for anyone with some HR experience who is looking to go remote! 

Copy Editor at Snapchat: Yep, you can work remotely even for companies like Snapchat. This part-time contract position for a copy editor sounds really fun, and requires evening and weekend availability to cover the current entertainment news. You’ll be creating copy and editing graphics and filters for their Our Stories feature, and collaborating with the Content team to provide marketing assets that are pitch-perfect and on brand.

Marketing Manager at Code HS: If you’re passionate about technology and education, you’re probably familiar with Code HS. It’s an organization that makes it easier for schools to teach coding, with full curriculum and support. They’re looking for a marketing manager to spread the word through traditional routes, and favor those with a technical bent due to the nature of the product. If you have a blog, that includes you!

Customer Support Specialist at FormAssembly: Customer support jobs typically have the lowest barriers to entry for someone who is just starting a career with a remote position. Nearly everyone has some kind of customer service position on their resume, whether it’s in retail, serving, or a summer job at a golf course. FormAssembly gets great reviews from employees, and could be a fun and friendly place to start your new remote lifestyle.

User Experience Designer at TED: This job requires a bit more prior technical experience than I typically share here, but it’s such a cool one I couldn’t resist. TED Talks is looking for a new designer for user flows, UI mockups, running usability tests, and more. If you have a web and graphic design background, this would be an awesome chance to work at a really fun and influential non-profit!

August 4, 2017
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monthly roundup no. 3: june 2017

Posted in Living by

I can’t even believe that June is over so fast. It’s usually my favorite month – the heat is starting to ramp up, there’s a lot of time for beach trips and sunscreen, and the excitement of road trips and travel is fresh. I’m on the way to Memphis now, which is one of my favorite cities in the world. If you’re ever heading that way, be sure to visit the Stax Museum and Central BBQ – they’re both must-sees. Between distributing snacks around the car and getting excited about all the barbeque I’m going to stuff into my face, here are some of my favorite links from the month!

I love blogging and I’ve spent quite a bit of my life doing it! But sometimes it’s hard to find the authenticity in it anymore – things feel so curated between influencer networks and affiliate marketing and monthly income posts. I’ve been reading Venus Trapped In Mars for years, and she wrote about the same thing this month, so it’s nice to know I’m not alone.

I’ve spent the last couple of years barking about The Hold Steady and how great they are. This month, they took over Chicago for a weekend and I finally got to partake in one of their greatest traditions: the show-ending stage invasion. Check out this video for a great shot of my awkward dancing, and Dani, I’m sorry that the confetti will never leave our house.

Behind the scenes, I’ve been working on rebranding my blog – eek! None of the content will change, but I’ve never felt super connected to the blog name. Sure, I am a northern girl, and I love the north, but it was sort of just a throwaway I picked years ago when I first started. To work on new graphics and themes, I’ve been raiding CreativeMarketthese shapes are a sneak peek of the new feel!

I love being a digital nomad and things are becoming easier and easier all the time for people like us. Estonia wants to make things even easier. They have a system that allows you to become an “e-Resident” – this is a great article with more information on what the process is like, and what it means to become an e-Resident of a country. You don’t even have to visit (but that’s part of the beauty of being a nomad!) If you’re a digital nomad, or want to become one someday, I definitely recommend checking this out.

Zubaz hooked me up with a package of amazing legwear a few weeks ago, and I have always loved them. The more I wear them, the more I want to wear them. I’ll do a full post soon (including maybe a giveaway!) but they’re what I’m rocking in the car today. The comfiest travel pants ever.

Last week, I discovered slam poetry. I mean, I’ve always known what it is, of course, but I never sought it out. Amazon had recommended a book for me (Depression & Other Magic Tricks, do they know me or what?) which saw me going off to YouTube to find that author’s “Explaining My Depression to My Mother” poem. At first, I rolled my eyes a bit like “ugh, spoken word, woof…” and then I found myself in a vortex of amazing performances. The cadence similar to much of the rap and hip hop I love. Another favorite: “Ode to My Bitch Face.”

Zenfulie’s website isn’t updated regularly, but it’s one of the few mailing list emails that I read every week. Written by Sesame Street’s lead UX designer, it features great creative writing, short stories, and zodiac horoscopes. I highly recommend subscribing and reading every Sunday.

I’ve been reading voraciously lately – you’ll get a pretty full rundown on Monday of what I’ve been reading since the last update. Right now I’m reading You Are a Badass by Jen Sincero. I’m a bit late to the party on it, but halfway through, I’m loving it. In addition to the book, I’m also using the Best Self journal in an attempt to continue shifting my negative thoughts. A week into using it, I do like it a lot. Even though I might struggle on some days to think of three things I’m grateful for as soon as my 5:30 alarm goes off, it’s pushing me to think more positively. (I did receive a Best Self journal for review, but I truly do love it.)

You’ll Be More Successful Once You Stop Believing Anything Is Permanent, and that’s something I keep having to remind myself. It’s a principle in both The Four Agreements as well as cognitive behavioral therapy, and this post from Jessica Moorhouse is a great reminder that even if your life doesn’t look like what you expected, you can still have a great life.

 

What are you reading around the web this holiday weekend? I’m all ears!

June 30, 2017
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become location independent: Take Your Life Back book review

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This post contains affiliate links. I was provided a copy for review, but all opinions are my own.

Leah Davis of The Sweetest Way knew she didn’t want to have a traditional career or life – but she didn’t know how to make it happen. Over many years, she eked out her own way to accomplish her dream: a life of travel, location independence, and entrepreneurship. She’s hugely successful in the travel & lifestyle design community and recently released an eBook, Take Your Life Back, in order to help others who dream of the kind of life she’s living make it a reality.

The beginning of the book has a nice introduction, and Leah talks about jobs she tried in order to get her remote dreams to come true. Some fit her better than others, and each position helped her hone in on her strengths and skills more and more. After an overview of what location independence is, she also walks through what to expect and what personality types tend to excel in this kind of lifestyle.

  • One thing I noticed specifically is that this book is geared more toward those with an entrepreneurial bend than those interested in working remotely for a company or organization.

Leah discusses some of the mistakes she made along the way, along with the things that really helped her build success, like seeking out mentors and engaging and interacting with them. She talks about the “comparison is the thief of joy” concept, which I think anyone (especially bloggers) can relate to. It was nice for me to hear that and not feel like I’m the only one getting jealous of the success of others from time to time.

The book is hugely informative as it goes on – once it transitions out of her backstory, she gives some actionable resources that let you start building your skills, or looking for remote or freelance positions. She even provides steps on how you could start to negotiate with your current employer to move to a partially remote schedule to start in your lifestyle transition.

Every digital nomad should definitely have some kind of passive income source set up, and I agree with her. For me, Swagbucks is a big source of passive income – since I’m searching for things online anyway, it’s nice to accumulate points to redeem for cash or Amazon cards. Leah makes some suggestions on products or other ways to generate income without much effort – both online and offline. She also provides a list of her favorite affiliate companies.

Chapter seven is on building your online presence, and I wish I’d had some of this advice back when I started my blog! If you’ve been struggling with how to brand yourself or choose a domain name, Leah has some great advice and even reviews her own rebrand. She makes a choice not to overwhelm the reader with information on how to start blogging, which is really nice since there’s a wealth of information on that topic out there.

One of the longer chapters is on Pinterest secrets, and it was a very timely section for me to find. She shares some great data on Pinterest users and why everyone should be using it for their blog and business. (Yes, your own freelance or entreprenurial career is a business!) I’ll be going back to review this often, along with the added value links, to apply the tips and up my Pinterest game.

Leah Davis, author of Take Your Life Back

Leah Davis, author of Take Your Life Back

Take Your Life Back also covers investing in yourself and networking. It’s important to build relationships as well as your skills – Leah shares her favorite courses, conferences, and books, as well as online and in-person networking communities. The book also includes interviews with many of the people she’s befriended along the way who are also digital nomads, spotlighting their journeys to entrepreneurship.

She covers some of the less “fun” parts of becoming a digital nomad as well, like financial and tax considerations. I think if you’ve gotten to the point where you’re reading a book about location independence, you’ve considered the monetary implications, but the tax information and resources are very helpful.

The book goes on with ways to stay motivated on your journey, and also staying connected – sometimes, the travel lifestyle can make it difficult to find reliable wifi! Leah also talks her favorite destinations and ways to save money – I consider myself pretty Google savvy, but she had a lot of helpful tips on how to hack the search engine to help you find deals!

The bonus chapter is her social media management contract. It can even be edited for any type of freelance position – just carefully edit “social media” to apply to your gig.

There’s a ton of value in this book. A lot of these tips are things I’m working on right now (like Pinterest marketing!) so I’m working hard to put them into practice. The links she shares for online networking are super helpful as well and I’m excited to get involved. The chapter on Legal and Tax Considerations was super valuable as well – for me, and for anyone who has dipped their toes into online entrepreneurship in any fashion.

Pick up your copy today, and be sure to visit The Sweetest Way for more great information and resources!

Are you a digital nomad, or are you aspiring to be? Share what you’re working on with us!

June 9, 2017
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non-traditional jobs that let you travel

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This post contains affiliate links.

“Digital nomad” is more than a buzzword – it’s a way of life for a lot of travel lovers. Not all of these workers are self-employed, either! There are many careers based around travel, or ways you can work while traveling the country or the world. If you’re looking for a more creative job that puts you on the road more often (or even a side hustle that helps pad your travel account), I have a few ideas for you!

Flight attendant: Full disclosure: I’ve secretly always dreamed of being a flight attendant. One of my favorite blogs, The Flight Attendant Life, does nothing to dissuade this desire. It’s definitely hard work, though. Not only do you get to travel as part of your job, you’ll also have the perk of layovers, flight benefits on your days off, and a lot of flight attendants are based out of crash pads in tropical locations. (Kara from The Flight Attendant Life was even based in Hawaii.) The major airlines aren’t the only ones hiring: smaller airlines like Allegiant and Frontier also have lucrative options, and smaller, boutique airliners are catering to travelers who prefer a bit more comfort. It’s not a pretty website, but Flight Attendant Careers gets updated regularly by tons of airlines adding to their workforce.

Amazon: The online retailer hires hundreds of seasonal “pickers” every year, and they often provide camping facilities for their employees as well so you’re never too far from home. Here’s one review of their work camping experience, and they also offer work from home positions in their customer service department.

Yachting: It turns out that yachting is a dream job I didn’t even know I had until I happened to see Below Deck on Bravo one day (the source of all dream jobs, right?) These positions can be super lucrative, but they are hard work. You’re stuck on a small boat for weeks or months with the same few people, serving to assist the owners or charter guests, and depending on your position, doing laundry all day and night. (Which, honestly, doesn’t seem like the worst job on a yacht.) Read Lucky Charming by Kate Chastain (yachtie on Below Deck,) check out jobs on CrewfindersYacrew, and Bluewater Yachting – or just move down to one of the yacht capitals to get head hunted. (Another tip courtesy of Amy on Below Deckchecking out Craigslist in Fort Lauderdale! is )

VA: Being a virtual assistant is one of the most popular careers for digital nomads, and with good reason. Because there are so many tools out there that let you automate things like social posting, easily edit photos, and communicate with clients no matter what time zone you’re in (not to mention hotspots that allow you to hop on the internet from anywhere,) it’s one of the most flexible jobs available. Like I mentioned in my post on jobs you can do from home, larger VAs or agencies hire subcontractors if you don’t want to start your own business.

Music tour jobs: Growing up, my dream was to be a tour manager. I would still love to go on the road someday, but I’m at an age where it doesn’t really seem like it’s going to happen for me anymore. The music industry does tend to be all about who you know, with jobs often coming through by word of mouth. Bobnet was started at as listserv a few years ago, and it has an online board and Facebook group now where jobs are shared. roadiejobs.com is a resource that does post some tour jobs, and it’s worth checking out (but don’t expect to see a lot of every city as you tour – drives are long, days are longer, and sleep usually takes priority over sightseeing.) Another option to get on the road is to work with a sponsor for a big tour, like Warped Tour. Anti-smoking organization The Truth hires “riders” to travel to schools, concerts, and other events for promotions and marketing. If you’re vegan, PETA also hires touring interns and employees, as do other non-profits on the tour. A lot of them are internships or volunteer positions, but if this is a career you’re interested in and you’re in college, it’s an invaluable experience to have under your belt.

(Or think really outside the box – NASCAR races and teams also travel every weekend, and they have sponsors and merch trucks that need sellers too!)

Dance companies: I love Dance Moms, what can I say. The idea of spending weekends working at dance competitions actually just seems humorous to me! Aside from the parental drama, I do love dance and some of them are really beautiful and moving. Groove, Starquest, and NextLevelDance are just a few of the companies that produce these events.

Bus driving: If you like responsibility and prefer to travel with your wheels on the ground, bus driving is something to explore. Whether working for a travel company like Greyhound or as a private charter, you’ll have the option for long haul tours or jaunts that keep you closer to home.

For a similar side hustle on a smaller scale, look into limousine services or car rental businesses. Even a few hours of driving a week can result in lots of extra tips!

Cruise ships: “But you already talked about boats,” you might be saying. Cruise ships are an entirely different animal than the luxury world of yachting. They seem to have lower pay as there aren’t large tips (traditionally) on cruises, but they do offer many different niches like live entertainment or food service. Apply directly to a cruise line, check the job board at All Cruise Jobs, or hit indeed.com – some cruise lines even hire reservation agents and customer service staff to work remotely.

Event companies: Like the music tour sponsor and marketing companies, there are businesses that are dedicated to setting up large-scale events. These jobs have always seemed super fun, and I have quite a few friends that have worked for companies like Red Frog Events and Compass Rose. Traveling to different cities every week to set up conferences or fitness events, there is often some downtime to head out and check out the locale.

Tour guide: If you’re comfortable leading groups, this could be the best job for you. There are lots of organized travel agencies out there looking for trip leaders! G Adventures has a long history, as does Contiki, who hires local drivers as well as guides. Newer organizations like Remote Year are also looking for operations and experience managers in the cities they visit. If you have a lot of travel experience in a particular region, you can even make more!

Theater crew: If you’re artistically inclined but haven’t ever wanted to chase the rock ‘n roll lifestyle, a touring theater group could be your ticket to fame. (See what I did there?) Since plays and musicals tend to have longer stays in specific towns than music tours, they might be more desirable for someone not interested in the rushed pace of a different city every day. Even if you’re not a performer, there’s a place for you. Check out opportunities with specific troupes (like Cirque du Soleil or Blue Man Group!) or check out job boards at Playbill. brokeGIRLrich also has a super comprehensive resource of theatre job boards as well!

Housesitting: Yes, there are some people who make a career of housesitting! Many wealthy people who have multiple residences hire house sitters to stay at their different homes while they’re away. These positions usually involve a small bit of housekeeping or maintenance, but who cares? For free board in a lot of beautiful locations, I would probably have the tile floors scrubbed cleaned. Most of the job search sites for these positions are paid, and there’s a lot of background checks that can go into the application (with good reason.) Depending on what you’re looking for, House Sitters America, Luxury House Sitters and The Caretaker Gazette are good places to start. Even care.com has opportunities for house sitters!

National Parks: Any tourism industry will have boom and bust times where they need to hire more employees. National Parks are no different, and they’re a popular job option for many retirees who still want to work, but want to travel. It’s not just for retirees, though – many younger people are choosing this option to head out and explore. Check out this post on finding a job in a National Park!

Like this post? Sign up for my mailing list for more resources on non-traditional jobs that let you work remotely and travel more!

May 19, 2017
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